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Archive for the ‘Israel & Palestine Graffiti’ Category

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According to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics, the Dheisheh Refugee camp is the 6th biggest in the West Bank with about 13,000 inhabitants. The camp was created outside of Bethlehem in 1949 to accommodate 3,400 Palestinians from 45 villages west of Jerusalem and Hebron who fled during the 1948 War.

Like another refugee camp I once visited in Tyre, Lebanon, the Dheisheh camp is very neat and tidy. Yet its streets are narrow. Accommodation is compact and tight. Apparently, 15% of houses are not connected to the central sewage.

Graffiti is everywhere in the camp. Probably, it is the highest graffiti density that I have ever seen on my travels in the Middle East thus far.

All pictures in this post are mine. Therefore, I apologise for the quality.

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These amusing graffiti of the ‘Lego policemen’ appear in various places in Tel Aviv. I see those guys every time I head to the beach.

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Here are a few selected pictures from my travels in Israel and the West Bank.

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Those who lived in Tel Aviv, or happened to visit the Eastern Mediterranean’s finest, should remember some of these graffiti. Found all over the city, they are less famous than Banksy’s graffiti on the West Bank barrier or other ‘sophisticated’ pictures, yet they embody the very spirit of Tel Aviv: secular, optimistic and somewhat careless.

I am unaware of cultural context here. Who is Zizi?

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